About your Search

20110301
20110331
SHOW
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 23
KQEH (PBS) 13
WMPT (PBS) 5
WETA 3
KQED (PBS) 2
LANGUAGE
English 46
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
documentary, all of this was avoidable? >> well, it is horrible, of course. america went through 40 years without any financial crisis when regulation was much tighter, and banking was not quite so exciting. you know, banking has got an exciting in a very dangerous way, and we have to return to a much more regulated financial sector. i hope that the american people will become upset enough and angry enough and informed enough and activist enough to do something about this. tavis: you mentioned president bush in your indictment of what went wrong. this is not a republican problem. there is blame for the clinton administration, blamed for the obama administration. talk about the bipartisan nature of this crisis. >> it is a fairly bipartisan problem at this point. many of us, including myself, were deeply disappointed with president obama's behavior. he said things during his campaign that led us to believe he would take action about this, and when people voted for him and contributed to his campaign, i think many thought these issues would be addressed, and it has been a huge disappointment
of being exposed to those young folk? we'll come back to america in a second but when you move around the world seeing you talking to kids, playing in venezuela. what do you get out of that? >> first, it helps you understand the cycle of life. you're giving them information but they are also giving you information. as you get older, for example, in our band, we have members in our band like carlos and i taught them when they were in high school and now they teach me. i said man, can you break this rhythm down? carlos was our music director in cuba. he has been instrumental in a lot of my education. i started to develop a saying with them. they teased me all the time. you had the that familiar relationship. i said you have to follow your young leadership too. so i get so much from having an opportunity to interface with them and bring information to them and to represent our culture and our way of life. the feeling and the want and the love is unbelievable. the exchange that goes on between students and teachers or visiting people who are doing master classes. not just musicians gecln
america." sharifa rhodes-pitts focuses on black life in harlem. we're glad you have joined us. aaron eckhart and author sharifa rhodes-pitts coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer. nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financiaraitend acyem reovte an obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thk an [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: pleased to welcome aaron eckhart back to this program. his movies include "thank you for smoking," "the dark knight" and "in the company of men." his latest, "battle: los angeles," the film opens everywhere friday. here now a scene from "battle: los angeles." >> oh, just a little doggy. it is just a dog. dog. what's his name, huh? >> glen. >> who
the other day -- that's how they look at america -- y'all always have black presidents on tv. yeah, 400 years later. that's how that works. defensive what did you make of the fact that here we are 400 years late we are an african-american president and now all these television roles have opened up where you can play president? >> it's great. i did a film called "de impact" where mnga freem played the president -- tavis: it was on cable the other night. >> so many questions were, do you think we will ever see a black president? it's a fantasy. to see that, and it opens up a whole other world for actors to play and we've seen the portrayal but now that it is a reality, it's not a leap at all. tavis: i don't know how much fun the actual president is. how much fun are you having playing one? >> i get all the love. you couldn't pay me enough. tavis: the back story is to the series -- >> well, to the series, it's called "the event." it deals with a couple of hundred people who have been in prison for 66 years. when he comes to be president, he wants to release them. we found out they're nonhu
. tavis: america was a corp. before it was a country. >> when i see the focus on not being on a revolution of the economy, a change of the economic system, not to me it is the same old same old. this was so poignant. i was in chicago and i had the opportunity to be with his staff whether it is playing basketball before he became the president- elect. i could not shake his hand. i did not want to go to the park to hear the speech. i was sitting there and i watched the speech on television. i could agree with the setting of the justice and equality even if they own slaves. when he said, we need to get out of iraq, i was done. from that moment, i was done. i respect him and i love him as a brother but there are some serious issues. tavis: how do your fans handle this? your fan base is young and energized. i've not seen any research on the lupe fiasco fan club beside myself. a good number of the people who are fans of yours for those out there campaigning for obama. they were campaigning for the first time in their lives. there were powerful truth about the administration, the system. can your
] >> for generations the united states of america has played a unique role as an anchor of global security and as an advocate for human freedom. mindful of the risks and costs of military action, we are naturally reluctant to use force to solve the world's many challenges. but when our interests and values are at stake, we have a responsibility to act. that's what happened in libya over the course of these last six weeks. tavis: president obama of course monday night addressing the nation on u.s. m.s.g. action in libya. for more tonight i'm joined by congressman ron paul, the texas republican is a member of the house foreign affairs committee. he joins us tonight from the capital. congressman g. to have you back on this program. thank you for your time, sir. >> thank you, thank you. >> the president said we had to act in libya. is he right? >> i think he's wrong. what are our interests and what are our values? our values are defending the constitution. our interests are not served by starting wars. this is a preventive war. this is going and in saying we're going to prevent something from
diplomacy as, where we are concerned, as americans having to sell or explain america to the rest of the world in a way that they get and understand. if we take that definition, one could argue, given your point, that mr. bush is not cut out for public diplomacy, that at a point where we need to be engaged in the world right about now, given the mess that we are in, this is not the guy to put out in front as our diplomat in chief. >> i do not want to criticize the president, but i think this is very important, and i think he needs to convey the attitude to this administration that we need to be talking to the other countries. otherwise, we are not going to get to where we want to get. tavis, the real way to engage them is to talk about what their interests are, not what their positions are. sometimes, their positions are totally unacceptable to us, but if you understand what would be good for them, then you can get closer to home. tavis: what would be hypothetical be saying to a country like iran or syria, if the president were, to your point, to change on a dime and begin talking
conversation about the plight of america's aging boomers with best-selling author and journalist susan jacoby. hurt -- the book is called "never say die: the myth and marketing of the new old age." we are glad you have joined us. our conversation with susan jacoby, coming up. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference -- >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. >> nationwide is on your side >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- tavis: susan jacoby is a best- selling author. her latest is "never say die: the myth and marketing of the new old age." susan jacoby, a bit too heavy on this program. >> wonde
, and the korean war combined. this war has cost more than $100 billion per year, and some of america's brightest military minds about the war is even winnable. tonight, a conversation of what has become the longest war in u.s. history with former assistant secretary of defense and vietnam veteran bing west. in his book, he offers a speeding critique and says the u.s. military should not be in the business of nation-building. his new book is called "the wrong war." our conversation with bing west coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: as i mentioned at the top, the war i
. it was not like that. these people, especially on the rens, were the ones that made it possible for america to accept black americans as basketball players. tavis: how funny is it to you to think at one point the nba was all white? people cannot even imagine that these days. >> it is hard to conceive now especially looking back in recent history. let's go back when the lakers for started. we show a picture of them. it was an all white team. tavis: hard to imagine. i'm glad they changed that. "on the shoulders of giants" brought to us by kareem abdul- jabbar. he made a whole new life for us as an historian. good to have you on. great work. you can watch it on video on demand for the next few months and on dvd. congratulations again. that is our show for tonight. until then, good night. thanks for watching. as always, keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org tavis: award winning author, mark richard. that is next time. we will see you then. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to e
that by 1900 black people in america had no writes, they couldn't vote, we had complete segregation which was against the amendments. now, if this is not a political action, i don't know what is. tavis: but how do you explain to folk, certainly young folk who are taught every day in civics class, in history class, that the supreme court is an apolitical body? >> it's very difficult because everywhere you read, the two political branches of government, the executive and the legislative, as if the court is somehow different. but i would say, look at key decisions, how many times does a justice render a decision that goes against his ideology? bush versus gore, five conservative justices vote for bush, four liberal justices vote for gore and i don't distinguish between conservative and liberal justices. i think that people bring their own particular point of view to the law and it isn't necessarily that they're cynical. this is how they see things. but politics in a democracy is people seeing things in different ways, getting together, and coming to some consensus. but the difference in the
in their abilities. that is one of the things that drives me. i believe in america. the bottom line is americans are competitive by nature. we want to beat the pants off of china. i have to believe that at some point, if we continue to talk about education and continue to bring these issues to light, the american public is going to wake up and say we want to be number one in the world. we want to have the best education system for our kids. this is the ideal this country was founded on, the idea that every kid, regardless of their race, socioeconomic status, and zip code can live the american dream if they work hard and do the right thing. that is not the reality we have today, but i believe it is possible because i believe it is who we are as americans. tavis: i appreciate your time tonight. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org tavis: join me next time for more on the debate over u.s. intervention in libya. that is next time. we will see you then. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone
point in america in the 1900s. anyway let's have a look at the piece itself, because what makes it special is it's in a nice frame. and the frame itself is german pewter, austrian pewter. and it's very organic, because this is very much an art nouveau shape. it's very much art nouveau in period. the glass itself is actually a very deep cobalt blue. the technique here is referred to as papillon glass, or butterfly glass. in other words, it has the effect almost of an iridescent butterfly wing. anyway, people collect them. lots of people love iridescent glass. and lurz and tiffany, the top of the tree. well, i don't know what your son's father-in-law paid for the house, but you can tell him that the vase that was left behind is worth a princely sum of around about £800. he'll be pleased to hear that. - yeah. - he will indeed.
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)